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Child porn victims seek multimillion-dollar payouts

New York attorney James Marsh, who represents Amy, hired a psychologist and economist to evaluate her and calculate the damage that has stemmed from her abuse and the continuing distribution of the images documenting it. Accounting for lost wages, counseling and lawyer fees, they settled on a price of $3.37m. The claims demand that each person convicted of possessing even one of the images pay her damages until the threshold $3.37m is reached under a legal doctrine known as joint and several liability. Under the theory, Amy will stop collecting once the figure is ...

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Child porn victims seek multimillion-dollar payouts

"Each and every redistribution of the images causes a distinct injury to the victim," Marsh told The Register. "It's a very deliberate act that they choose when they go seek images of my client out." Marsh and other child victim advocates argue that the requirement to prove the convicted person proximately caused the damages, applies only to this last catchall item. The other losses need only be established by a preponderance of the evidence, which is almost always satisfied by a conviction that includes one or more images of the victim.

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EXCLUSIVE: Pedophiles Find a Home for Social Networking — on Facebook

James Marsh, an attorney who represents victims of child sexual exploitation, says Facebook must do more than just what is required by law. "Facebook has a moral and public duty to monitor and stop this activity on their site. Hiding behind legal technicalities is not enough to be a good corporate citizen in the digital age," Marsh said. "Facebook needs to put children ahead of profits and do what Congress and the American people expect -- protect our kids from criminals like NAMBLA." Hemanshu Nigam, co-chairman of President Obama's Online Safety Technology Working ...

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Child porn victims heard

But New York attorney James Marsh notes one of his clients, a young woman known only as Amy, has provided a statement "in well over 500 criminal cases." The statement "not only expresses the often-devastating effect of a crime on a victim, but in cases like child pornography -- where the victims are young and all but invisible to the court -- (it) really empowers a victim like Amy in what is otherwise seen as a so-called victimless crime." Amy's words, written at age 19, recount a life scarred by a family member's sexual abuse starting when she was 4. That experience ...

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Online Viewer of Child Pornography Ordered to Pay Restitution to the Victim

A man caught with pornographic images of a girl being sexually abused by her uncle has been ordered to pay restitution of nearly $50,000 to the victim, even though the defendant was a viewer of illegal images collected from the Internet who has never met the uncle or the girl. Northern District of New York Judge Gary L. Sharpe decided that a mere "consumer" of child pornography is culpable to some degree for the emotional and psychological damage suffered by sex abuse victims under 18 U.S.C. §2259(b)(1), which allows awarding compensation for the "care required to ...

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Prosecutors pursue restitution for child-exploitation victims

But not everyone agrees on exactly who should be ordered to pay restitution: Should it be limited to the person who produced the pornography, or should people who possess the images be required to pay? New York attorney James R. Marsh thinks it should be both. He represents a woman, now 21, who goes publicly by the pseudonym "Amy." She is the subject in one of the most actively traded child-pornography series, known as the "Misty series." Amy was 8 years old when she was victimized. Marsh has made more than 400 requests for restitution for his client since September ...

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Victims of child porn seeking restitution

A victim from rural Pennsylvania who goes by the pseudonym "Amy," for example, has received $231,102.28 from nine defendants so far, said her attorney, James M. Marsh. The money is paying for therapy for Amy, now 20, who lives with her parents and is on public assistance. The attorney said his client is hoping to buy a house with some of the money, which would be a step forward for her. Seeking restitution has helped Amy become stronger, Marsh said. "She really feels empowered by what is happening and that she is no longer a victim," Marsh said. "She is someone ...

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Minn. lawyer aims to track, sue child porn users

James Marsh, an attorney who represented the young woman for which Masha's Law was named, said few lawsuits have been filed under it partly because few child pornography victims come forward. Also, jurisdictional issues can pose a problem. But he said Anderson's approach is novel. "The real key to success here will be his ability to join all of these matters in Minnesota. If he can't do that, it will be a nightmare of epic proportions," Marsh said. "There are a lot of barriers to a successful litigation, but we definitely wish him good luck."

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Despite Content Purge, Pornographic Images Remain on Wikimedia

"Clearly some of the currently available drawings are obscene, and individuals have been prosecuted for downloading and possessing similar material," said James Marsh, an attorney who represents victims of child sexual exploitation. The FBI has not commented on whether it's pursuing charges. But it could, said Marsh, who pointed to several legal precedents in which prosecutions have been made based on sexually explicit depictions of children similar to the images on Wikipedia. "Wikipedia has an undisputable affirmative corporate responsibility to keep such material ...

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Wikipedia Distributing Child Porn, Co-Founder Tells FBI

But the threat is even greater than the images themselves, says James Marsh, an attorney who wrote about Sanger's letter to the FBI on his Child Law Blog. "Wikipedia's continued interest in child sexual exploitation is troubling not only because the site hosts some questionable images, but because it can easily serve as a gateway to other sites containing child pornography," Marsh told FoxNews.com. "One simple link buried in the text of an article on Japanese anime or child pornography could easily take an unsuspecting child or adult user to a place which is not only ...

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