Pricing Amy: Should Those Who Download Child Pornography Pay the Victims?

American Bar Association Journal

Amy and her lawyer are, however, fighting back. Her battle is part of a series of cases - now wending their way through the federal courts - trying to help the victims of child pornography by seeking financial restitution, not from the perpetrator but from the untold number of people who subsequently download their pornographic images.
Amy could be considered the leader in this legal trend. Her pictures are among the most widely traded in the underground world of online child pornography.

Under the Crime Victims' Rights Act, the government must notify Amy and other child pornography victims anytime anyone is arrested by federal authorities for possessing their images. Her attorney, James Marsh of New York City, says his office has received at least 1,500 required notices of federal prosecutions for possession of those images. "The day after we were retained in 2008, we had someone open up all these notices she received in the calendar years 2006 and 2007," Marsh says. "It took two days just to open the envelopes."

Using the restitution provisions of the Violence Against Women Act, Marsh has begun utilizing the courts to request financial restitution from those convicted of possessing images of Amy's child sexual abuse.

The novel and controversial requests don't seek to hold possessors responsible for the original exploitation of Amy. Rather, they seek restitution under VAWA, as authorized by the Crime Victims' Rights Act, for harm done to Amy each time someone downloads her uncle's pornographic images of her.

Find more information online here.

Filed Under Child Pornography News Restitution 

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