Title IX


He said it was consensual. She said she blacked out. U-Va. had to decide: Was it assault?

When Haley Lind was found alone in a stranger’s bathroom, she was naked and in a drunken stupor, barely able to stand or speak, a raucous party raging around her. She awoke in her bed hours later, her head pounding, leaves in her hair, soaked in her own urine.“I think I got assaulted last night,” she texted a friend the morning after the annual welcome-back-to-school Block Party at the University of Virginia. “Something just feels very wrong.”The Washington Post reconstructed the events of the night Lind says she was sexually assaulted at U-Va. — and ...

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Debate brews over role of anonymous Title IX-related complaints in course evaluations

Though the University effectively rejected a proposal created by the University Senate’s Faculty Affairs Committee to prohibit internal investigations into anonymous Title IX-related complaints made in course evaluations, fears surrounding the issue persist.The proposal asks that the University disregard anonymous complaints made on course evaluations and campus publications’ comment sections that could compel a Title IX investigation against faculty members. In response to an inquiry made by Spectator, the University released a statement saying they were obliged ...

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W&M, U.Va. under investigation for handling of sexual assaults

James R. Marsh said the department has taken "an inordinate amount of time" to investigate allegations about how the university handled his client's 2011 rape case.Those complexities are reflected in the suits Marsh filed in March in U.S. District Court in Washington - one seeks to press OCR to hold U.Va. accountable and another action challenges new provisions of the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination (SaVE) Act.Supporters say the SaVE reforms put more responsibility on colleges to stop assaults, but others, including Marsh, contend the changes allow the schools ...

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Allegations of a botched UVA rape investigation at center of a challenge to the Campus SaVE Act

Filed in federal court in Washington, D.C. on March 6, the suit is intended as a landmark civil rights action that could derail the controversial Campus Sexual Violence Elimination (SaVE) Act, according to Doe's attorney James Marsh. Touted as a major reform turning point by supporters, SaVE pushes more responsibility for preventing sexual assault onto colleges. The new federal law gets some things right, Marsh said "particularly education initiatives aimed at students” but it seriously undermines recent federal efforts to force schools to take a harder line on sexual ...

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